#255: Generating Clients Through LinkedIn with Hailey Rowe

Generating Clients Through LinkedIn with Hailey Rowe - Hailey Rowe smiling

You’ve heard about LinkedIn…maybe you’ve even set up a profile as a health coach. Now it’s time to learn how to leverage this powerful platform! Listen in as our guest, Hailey Rowe, walks us through the basics of generating leads and new clients.

Mentioned on this episode:
Get Hailey’s free LinkedIn class at HaileyRowe.com/linkedin

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Full transcript:

Michelle:
All right. Hello there Health coaches, nice to be back with you today. Have a very special episode. We've never talked about LinkedIn before. I don't think I've breathed a word about LinkedIn on this podcast in the past five years, maybe here and there. I don't know, but it's definitely not my jam. It is a very cool place to be when you're looking for clients. So I thought, why don't we bring someone on who can actually speak to this intelligently. So today we have Hailey Rowe with us. Hailey is a marketing and sales consultant and coach and a LinkedIn lead generation service provider. Did I get that all right, Hailey?

Hailey:
You did. Yes. Thanks for having me, Michelle.

Michelle:
We're so glad you're here. So we do get questions about LinkedIn from time to time. I have to admit, if you look me up on LinkedIn, it's one of those sad, sorry profiles that put up maybe a hundred years ago, and it's just hanging out there looking bad. So I'm assuming other people are like me. Maybe you have a LinkedIn profile from when you were still working in a corporate job or maybe you are still working in a corporate job. So you have that kind of presence on LinkedIn. Maybe you have nothing at all. Where do we start?

Hailey:
Yeah, well first let me tell you why you'd even want to start on LinkedIn and then we can talk about profile optimization if you want to because that would be a good first step before you start doing lead generation on LinkedIn. Because if your profile is looking rough and people are going to definitely check it out when you connect with them, we want to address that first. So LinkedIn is a platform that people go to expect networking. And a lot of people have a misconception that LinkedIn is only for if you're looking for a job or LinkedIn is only for recruiters, or you have to be super stiff on LinkedIn and you can't have any fun with it or post anything personal or anything like that. And there's just a lot of misconceptions. So the way I see it is LinkedIn is one of those lower maintenance social media platforms in that you do not have to post all the time to be successful.
So that's one reason why I love it. You don't have to be dancing in reels or doing anything super crazy. You can post every once in a while, but it's not a high maintenance platform. And then two, as I said, people expect networking on it. So it's a great place to connect with potential partners, people who you want to form referral partnerships with potential clients if you work with a certain type of professional. So it can be very, there's a lot of different ways you can use it and it's growing and the average income on LinkedIn is higher than some of the other social media platforms. So a lot of times there's more purchasing power on LinkedIn as well. So those are just a couple of reasons why it would make sense to use LinkedIn because Instagram and Facebook, a lot of times people just use those for entertainment and don't expect networking or connecting or talking with people.
But as far as where to start, where to even start. So you want to make sure, of course you have a LinkedIn account in the first place, but once you do, the first step is to optimize your profile. And what that means is you want to have just like, I'm sure you've covered this on your show before, maybe with Instagram bios and things like that, but within the first three seconds of me coming to your LinkedIn profile, you want to have people know how you can help them, who you work with and what you do. So right underneath your name section on the LinkedIn part of your profile, there's a little section where you can have a short blurb about what you do. And I recommend putting the results, key results or results you provide, anything that boosts your credibility. So if you, for example, are a podcast host, you could put that if you got an award of some kind, you could put that if you're a certified coach, you could list what kind, something along those lines.
And then there's also a place right at the top of your profile where you can put a link nowadays on LinkedIn. So I recommend putting, if you have a free lead magnet, like a free gift of some kind that people can opt into your email list, that would be a good thing to put right at the top. And then from there, what LinkedIn allows you to do is customize the sections you have on your profile. So you'll definitely have an about section, which is where you share what you do, why you're credible to help somebody, maybe a little tiny blurb about your story, but I recommend really structuring it in a way that is spaced out. Maybe have bullet points if you can have a call to action at the bottom of that, book a free call or sign up for my free gift or whatever it is.
You can add a featured tab on LinkedIn. There's a part that says add sections to your profile. And what a featured section is is where you can put your best stuff that you want people to see. So if you post on LinkedIn a testimonial that you want to save to the top of your profile, you could do that in the featured section or you were on a really big podcast, you could put that there. You definitely want that. And then you want to have your work experience of the past, which is somewhat important if you're a coach, but not as important as if you were, for example, looking for a job or something like that. But if you have past experience that you wanted to share in your work experience for your current company, you've helped X number of clients or where they can learn more about you on your website and stuff like that, you could include that.
Make sure your profile picture is looking at the camera, smiling eyes open, no sunglasses, that kind of thing. And one other common, you could have a recommendation section where people can leave you reviews or if you were on a podcast they could say, wow, so-and-so was a great guest on my podcast. And the last thing I'll say is at the top of your profile, there's a part for a cover photo if you wanted to, you could put how they could get your free gift there or you could put a little short blurb about what you do in a of you. So you could use that as valuable real estate to promote whatever you're looking to promote or just really quickly generate some curiosity from the people who check out your profile. So I'll pause, that's a lot of info, but that would be a good first step so that now when we're going to move on to attracting clients and partnerships, which we could talk about, you at least have a profile that's looking pretty good.

Michelle:
So if you have an old profile like mine, would you suggest going in there and deleting the old jobs that I had 20, 30 years ago when I was, starting out? I used to work in advertising, so I have all these ad jobs, but that's not relevant. If I was looking for coaching clients now just get rid of that stuff?

Hailey:
Great question. So I don't know if I would say, I would definitely put at the top what you're doing now and prioritize obviously what you want people to see. But I would say advertising kind of does add to what you do today and your experience. It shows that you've worked in the field because you help people with email list growth and all that kind of stuff. So I do think that that could still be there in your work experience. And it also helps you be more searchable. So if somebody was looking for somebody who has advertising experience, you would have a more likely chance of them finding you. So I don't think it's a bad thing to have it, but of course you want to do a little audit on your profile and be like, is this relevant? Is this just fluff? Have a little bit of a filter. If I was looking at this as a potential client, would I be really overwhelmed by all this information or is it clean?

Michelle:
Okay. So in speaking to our health coach audience, it sounds like if you've had a job in nutrition, maybe as a teacher or some type of other coaching work that you've done that would all be relevant to keep on had you been an accountant in a past life, maybe that's something to get rid of or downplay not really relevant anymore.

Hailey:
And I get a lot of questions from health coaches who are transitioning. So I work with a lot of health coaches and they're a lot of times wanting to transition to their business and they're like, well, do I need, what about I still have to use LinkedIn for my other job? Should I have two profiles? What should I do? And I would say, if you can prioritize your current LinkedIn profile for what you're trying to do with your health coaching, but if you had to, you could have a little blurb about, and I also do blah, blah, blah, blah by day. And you could tie, I even had a client who was an engineer and she tied it into that has helped my health coaching approach because I'm very much step-by-step, blah, blah, blah. So I don't think you need to worry. It doesn't mean you can't use LinkedIn if you have a day job currently that you have to have a LinkedIn for. It's just more of a nuanced approach of how do I communicate that I'm doing health coaching and a lot of the networking goes down behind the scenes too, so it's like in the messages. So it's not that you can't use LinkedIn now because you have a day job and you're doing your health coaching. It's more so a lot of that will be end messages and stuff.

Michelle:
Okay, cool. So we have lots of different kinds of health coaches. You mentioned some are transitioning, don't want to be in my full-time job anymore. I want to be health coaching. Some are just doing this as a side thing. Some are working with their moms locally, some are trying to go corporate. Who is LinkedIn great for? Who should really be perking up their ears during this episode?

Hailey:
So LinkedIn is great for business owners who want to do one of the following things. One is connect with potential clients if your niche could be a type of professional or professionals. So in other words, if you work with busy moms, you can't go on LinkedIn and type in busy moms and find them. You would've to say busy mom professionals in high stress jobs. And then we are more clear on, okay, well maybe they're in accounting roles or maybe they're in executive roles or something like that. So it could be great for that. It could be great for partnerships. So if you are a business owner who, let's say you are a health coach and you want to partner with chiropractors locally or you want to be a part of corporate wellness, so you want to reach out to people in HR and local businesses near you, it could be great for that.
So partnerships and corporate wellness speaking is a third one. And then the last one would be if you're trying to get visibility opportunities, like you want to be on podcasts or you want to be part of summits or you're looking to collaborate with like-minded business owners. So maybe you're not looking to partner with a local chiropractor, but maybe you know that your ideal clients also enjoy reiki or something and you want to do lives with other reiki healers or something like that. You could do stuff like you could find people like that. So it's good for collaborating but also connecting with your potential clients.

Michelle:
Yeah, I mean when I think of LinkedIn, I think more B2B businesses we're looking for and networking with other businesses. Would you say it's mostly that or is it 50/50? Sometimes we're there B2B and sometimes we're looking B2C, which is business to consumer and we're looking directly for the clients themselves?

Hailey:
Yeah, I would say it's more so B2B angle, but that means that even if you are trying to go B2C, there's always a way to do that if you can tailor it to I help. For example, I had a client who does health coaching and helps people prevent burnout. And the only difference on LinkedIn compared to when she's marketing on Instagram, which is just for women on LinkedIn, she was more so talking to women in tops of their role and feeling stressed and burnt out. And so that's the only tweak we made. I would say yes, B2B could be a faster response rate if you're trying to get on podcasts and stuff, you can get a faster reply and then you get in front of many people at once when you do partnerships like that as opposed to one-to-one to a potential client on
LinkedIn.
So I usually recommend starting with the referral partners and that kind of thing. But I do have seen at work many times, for example, another client of mine worked with executives. She got her first high ticket sales within probably about eight weeks. And then she also, in addition to that, using it for B2B two got a part-time coaching role at a company. So it's cool because you can kind of split test and see what works the best. But yeah, it will depend on the niche. Now one thing I'll add is different niches on LinkedIn have different response rates are checking their LinkedIn more or less frequently, et cetera. So we've seen doctors, they don't check their LinkedIn as much as nurses or, so there's some interesting things that I picked up on throughout the years of helping clients with this of when we should change the niche or tailor the message and stuff like that. But yeah, hopefully that answers that question.

Michelle:
Yeah, sounds like there's a lot of use on there for lots of different health coaches. I love that. And I'm thinking as with any of these platforms, I mean I feel like an old lady when I say this, but all the different platforms that have come and gone through the years, the one thing I know for sure is they each kind of have their own language and their own culture and nuances and things that make sense on Facebook might not make sense on Instagram. And Lord, I don't even know what happens on TikTok or Snapchat or any of that. So my question is what do we need to know about the culture, so to speak, of being on LinkedIn? You mentioned that there's a lot going on in the messages. Would you say that's most of where the action is happening?

Hailey:
Absolutely, yeah, and that's a very good question. So LinkedIn, most of your benefits are going to come from sending connection requests, which you can send up to 200 a week currently on LinkedIn. Now, if you're brand new to using your profile, you're probably going to have to warm it up first before it allows you to do that. I've noticed that with a couple clients who I teach them how to do this, and they have noticed that if they haven't used their LinkedIn in a couple of years, it will help them. They have to start small. But anyways, you can work up to 200 connection requests a week to targeted individuals. So LinkedIn allows you to search certain titles. You could go to company pages and see their employees to find people. You can use LinkedIn groups to find like-minded people you're looking to attract. So there's several different ways to find who you're looking for on LinkedIn.
And I show that a little more sharing my screen and the free gif we're going to mention on here, the LinkedIn class. But just so you know, there's a couple of different ways you can find people anyways. Then from there you send a connection request with something very short that's usually just like, Hey, it's always great to connect with other business owners in the Chicago area, looking forward to getting to know you better. Let's say you're trying to take the collaboration approach. And then once they accept your connection request, I usually recommend sending a conversational question to see if they want to engage more with you. So if it's collaboration, it might be something like, Hey, I noticed we're both helping the blah blah blah niche in different ways. Would you be open to exploring collaboration, something like that, and then you can take the conversation further to a call or something along those lines. So that's kind of the culture of LinkedIn is it is that those conversations are important, but what you don't want to do and what you will see on LinkedIn, I'm sure is long salesy messages with a pitch that is not what we want to use it for. That's

Michelle:
Not ever anywhere you guys Yeah, lame. Super lame.

Hailey:
Exactly. It's more a conversational connection building tool to start the conversations and then take it to a call or take it to your freebie or whatever and see where that goes. It's not, let me send you my whole pitch right now. I don't know you, but here it is, right? That's not what works. And you unfortunately will see that, but you just have to disregard. And the other thing I'll say about LinkedIn is it's a place for thought leaders. So in the content on LinkedIn, you might not have to post stories all day or do things like that, but you do want to think about how can I create content that shows that I am an authority in my field or start an interesting conversation about something going on in your industry? Things like that. And the basic content principles though still apply on LinkedIn, meaning you still want to show social proof, you still want to overcome common hesitations or objections that your ideal clients might have. You still want to have value-based posts and engaging types of posts where you're asking a question or encouraging them to share or tag a friend or things like that. So the content principles are similar. It's just you also want to think about, could I be a thought leader on here in some way, shape, or form?

Michelle:
That reminds me, one of our healthy profit university members was looking into using LinkedIn and was thinking, well, I should start a blog. I could blog on LinkedIn, or I could blog on my own website. Or it seems like there's a way to republish to LinkedIn. What do you see working with that?

Hailey:
LinkedIn articles work really well, so those can help you get ranked for search engine optimization if it's good and people like it, and it is a great repurposing tool. So yeah, if you're already writing blogs on your website, totally repurpose 'em to some articles on LinkedIn. And the other thing you could do is take your blog and take a short part of it and just use that as a post on LinkedIn or something like that. So you could just repurpose to save yourself some time. But yeah, the articles is good. And one other thing I forgot to mention is that's different about the culture is there is a thing called LinkedIn groups. And what's cool about that is you could, let's pretend you're looking to connect with podcast hosts. There's probably groups of podcast hosts, or if you're in the health and wellness industry, there's health and wellness networking groups. So you could join groups like that. And what's different than Facebook, you guys have probably seen Facebook groups and Facebook groups tend to be pretty engaging. There's tons of threads like post your favorite blah, blah, blah on LinkedIn. They're a little less engaged in the group. But what's cool is when you're in a group with people on LinkedIn, LinkedIn allows you to connect with the members or see the members and message the members even if you guys aren't connected yet. However, I would recommend sending the connection request first. Just it's safer,

Michelle:
Polite.

Hailey:
It's polite. Exactly. And if you just send too many messages without connecting first, because normally on LinkedIn, in order to even be able to talk with somebody in messages, you have to be connected already. However, there's an exception for groups. If you're in the group with them, you can message them directly. But I just would say follow the typical protocol. And if you send too many messages without being connected first, LinkedIn will be like, you never use your profile, what's going on if you're new spam alert. Yeah. Yeah. So just kind of use the members thing in groups. That can be a really cool way to find the kind of people you're looking for without needing to search tediously. So yeah,

Michelle:
Very cool. No, I'm thinking as we're talking about, one of the women on my team, she was on LinkedIn, I say recently, it must've been six months ago by now. But anyway, she started talking with someone in messages and she connects with this guy and now it's her boyfriend. Oh,

Hailey:
No way.

Michelle:
And she was not on there trying to find a love connection, but that is just what ended up happening looking for, I guess like-minded people in her industry. And this is what ended up happening. So I was curious if you've ever connected with someone who just was totally not what you were expecting or maybe one of your clients, any funny stories about connections happening that way?

Hailey:
That is funny. I don't know if I have something as fun as that.

Michelle:
Yeah, try harder.

Hailey:
I have people who I've connected with and they've been like, oh, I already listened to your podcast, or I already knew about you from blah blah blah's podcast or something like that. I've also, when you have mutual connections with somebody, it'll show that to you on LinkedIn. So sometimes there's funny stories about how you guys know the same people or just have some kind of commonality. And that's actually a pro tip. I forgot to share. If you're going to start on LinkedIn, start connecting with people. You have something in common with either in the same town and they could be referral partners or potential clients, or you guys went to the same college, or you guys have some common interest in a similar interest type of group on LinkedIn. So try to make your life easier by having a commonality with somebody first, or mutual connections, get a better connection rate. Acceptance thing. Acceptance rate. But yeah, I don't have anything super fun. I will say on Facebook, I connected with somebody recently who knew one of my ex-boyfriends, and that's about it.

Michelle:
Alright, well you never know what you're going to run into when you start networking. That's why it's such a great tool because you might find your next client, you might find your next referral partner, you might find the love of your life, you might find someone who's going to redo the interior of your house. You never know once you start talking with people, and that's the beautiful flow of networking. It's not always, I'm going to put in a and I'm going to get out B, yes. I want to encourage you guys to put in a lot of a and just be open to whatever the universe is going to come back with, because often it will be something quite unexpected, but to a huge advantage in your life, in your business, both et cetera. You agree?

Hailey:
Yes. Always be thinking about how can I be useful? Not how can you be useful to me? How can I be useful and lead with that. And goodwill builds up and it becomes a lot more natural in business to be receiving when you're giving, right? And that's not the reason why you should even do it, but you do want to always be thinking about, I recommend going into networking with a feeling of curiosity, not I need to get something out of this, not desperation. I'm really curious what we could do together. I'm really excited to hear about this person. I'm really excited to see, could I connect them with somebody? Could I be useful to them? That kind of thing. And that will help you win, I think in networking compared to going at it like another one, another conversation. I hope I get something out of this that

Michelle:
Yes, pushing with the sales message. Yeah, I love that idea of thinking how can I be helpful? Let's do a quick, I dunno, like a makeover to the message that I guarantee health coaches are sending or the aura that you're putting off on LinkedIn, which could be something like, here's what I think it'll be a health coach. I want to book corporate workshops. So I'm going to go on LinkedIn, I'm going to find some corporations and I'm going to connect and send them a message that says, hi, I'm a health coach and I offer corporate workshops. Would you like to book one for this fall?

Hailey:
Yeah.

Michelle:
How do we do that better?

Hailey:
Yeah. So usually I like to start off with like, Hey, it's great to connect and then if there's something personal you can add, I love that your company stands for blah, blah, blah, blah or has a corporate wellness component. And then you can ask what we call a engaging question that can lead you to inviting to a corporate workshop. So in other words, you don't just say straight away, do you need corporate workshops? You could say, I'm always looking to provide employees and companies with, I'm looking to make my content here on LinkedIn useful for employees who want more productivity or companies I guess lead with the decision maker in mind. So if it's the company you're connecting with, focus on them, not the why do they care about their employees being healthy? So increasing productivity, whatever, decreasing sick days, whatever. Is there any kind of content that would be useful for you and your team?
I would love to make my content useful here on LinkedIn if you didn't already say that. So something like that that says, is there an even an interest here? Is there any struggles you have when it comes to getting your employees to show up and be healthy and blah, blah, blah. So I like to kind of tweak the question to seeing if they want to raise their hand a little bit that they have something that they're struggling with or a goal. And then you could say, oh, awesome, I do have some content about that. Or you could make content about that and say, would it be cool if I send you my free blah, blah, blah, or do you ever look for corporate wellness speakers as well, where I could create something custom, et cetera, et cetera. But it gives you so much more natural ability to offer value when you know what they actually want or need from you, what they've indicated something that they are looking for. So you want that first message to be something that would allow you to see if there is that interest.

Michelle:
That's funny. I don't know if you have kids, but when you're talking about this, all I thought of is trying to get a toddler to nap, and the last thing you're going to do is just walk over the toddler and say, Hey, do you want to take a nap? That's a sales pitch. You guys never works. You sweet talk 'em into it a little bit. You got to make 'em feel like it was their idea by being curious. How are you feeling? What do you want to do later when you wake up from your nap? It's kind of similar. So for all your health coaches out there that are like, I'm not the corporate type or I don't know how to have conversations with someone who wears a suit all day, I'm not that person. You can do this. It's just humans. It's just how humans talk. No one just walks up to each other and says like, Hey, here's this thing I want you to pay me for. That's terrible manners. I love the way that you reworked that conversation. So it starts to feel really natural for them to tell you what their need is, what they're looking for. And then, Hey, I actually have something about that. Would you be interested? Get the yes before you tell them about it

Hailey:
For sure.

Michelle:
Oh, I love it. Okay, so you alluded to it earlier, but you have a class for everyone to take and learn a little bit more and actually look at the screen about LinkedIn. Tell us.

Hailey:
Yes. Yeah. So I have a free class that shares how to attract clients and profitable partnerships using LinkedIn. It talks about where do you find people, what do's and don'ts for that connection message and the second message, all that. And it's at Hailey rowe.com/linkedin. And I also give you two example messages. Obviously I want you to customize those to your brand. I want you to personalize them, but it at least gives you somewhat of an example that's concrete. So that is all at haileyrowe.com/linkedin.

Michelle:
Well, fantastic you guys go around and get that because the next time you ask me a question about LinkedIn, I'm just going to point you to this episode anyway that you can all tell me how it works. I'm so glad that you were able to join us today, Hailey. This has been a welcome topic to include into our many, many, many podcast episodes. We were direly in need of talking about LinkedIn. Thanks for being here and everyone's going to go grab your class and if there's anywhere else you'd like to direct them, now's your chance.

Hailey:
Awesome. Yeah, I have a free community on Facebook called the Marketing Hub facebook.com/groups/the marketing Hub group. And I would love to connect with you there. I'm also on Instagram at Hailey Row. Michelle's going to be on my podcast Health Coach Nation. I'm very excited about it. So check that out on all the podcast platforms. And then haileyrowe.com.

Michelle:
Alright, I think that covers it. Thanks so much, Hailey. We'll see you soon.

Hailey:
Thank you.